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Capital tax issues with ownership of rental properties

If you are buying a property with your spouse or civil partner or even just a business partner and you intend to let it out, make sure your solicitor or conveyancer knows this and arranges the most suitable ownership status. Generally for tax reasons this will be as tenants in common. As a tenant in common you will each own a specific share of the property, which may be half, or a different specified percentage.

The other sort of joint ownership is known as a joint tenancy. In that … Continue Reading

A brief tax guide to buying and selling family and owner-managed companies

plant and machinery at the funfair

Plant and machinery at the funfair

If you are thinking of selling your business or thinking of buying one, please do get tax advice at the outset. Of course commercial considerations are paramount, but once you have decided in principle upon making a move to sell, or a move to buy and started looking at the numbers, do take into account that those numbers may be affected in a major way by tax considerations.

Selling the owner managed company

In most circumstances a small owner-managed … Continue Reading

Property taxation for smaller investors and developers

Recently I have written posts on Furnished Holiday Lettings and on the new Capital Gains regime. Such is the enthusiasm for property investment and development even in these troubled times (and I share that interest myself) that I thought I should write a brief summary of the taxation implications of these interests and activities.

Property still offers the prospect of profits and long-term investment gains at a time when share markets are uncertain and yields on savings are generally poor. … Continue Reading

Small business tax and the crystal ball

Following George Osborne’s “Emergency” Budget in June and still in the middle of a downturn, it is been hard to assess the immediate impact of the changes announced on small businesses. This practice acts for many who are wondering how they will be affected, and whilst there was a good deal of immediate reaction in the aftermath, there has been time for some more considered thought.

I am not blessed with second sight, but will dive into the debate anyway. Firstly, here are the basic measures:

Taxation of Furnished Holiday Lettings

Rather than bore you with another “Emergency” Budget Summary, and many of us including me have been inundated with very similar emails and documents containing the “key” facts, I am going to be picking out and expanding on a few items of interest. I think Furnished Holiday Lettings are a good place to start because they are an area of entrepreneurial potential and should be of interest to many.

In the 2009 Budget Chancellor Darling announced that the special arrangements distinguishing Furnished Holiday Lettings (FHL) from other types of letting … Continue Reading

The 50 Day Budget and idle speculation

We have a new Government in place and a new fiscal policy which we will learn about in the coming weeks. We know that there are going to be tax rises and we know something of what they will be, as well as of other measures.

  • The National Insurance increase planned for April 2011 will be only for employees. The “jobs tax” element of the increase which would have been imposed by the previous administration is not going to take place; at least not until the economy and jobs market seems to be recovering.
  • The tax free income tax Personal Allowance will … Continue Reading

Late, late tax planning

The 2009 Pre-Budget Report in December signalled a significant number of tax increases in the UK designed to make up the significant Budget deficit following the banking crisis. For many or our clients there will be a significant impact on their finances.-Income tax rates to rise and personal allowances to reduce for wealthier clients. -Future changes to rates applicable for dividends, trusts and NICs. -New 50% income tax band. There are further complicated rules for pension relief restriction and the end of well-established tax breaks for furnished holiday lettings (currently enjoying business tax advantages). There … Continue Reading

Stirring the pot

I watched with interest the interview on the Accountancy Age website with Dave Hartnett, Permanent Secretary for Tax about the New Disclosure Opportunity (NDO). To quote HMRC, “the NDO will allow people with unpaid taxes linked to offshore accounts or assets to settle their tax liabilities at a favourable penalty rate. It will run from the 1st Sept 2009 until 12 March 2010.If you have unpaid tax linked to an offshore account or asset to declare, to benefit from the terms of NDO you will need to notify us AND disclose (tell us the details, … Continue Reading

Blearsy-eyed!

We read here that Hazel Blears is to pay £13,332 on the sale of a second home. How is she going to do this? Presumably her accountants or tax advisers got the documentation right so that she successfully avoided a liability by making the appropriate election. The only way she can get HMRC to accept the money is by saying she made an error or worse, deliberately misled them. She will not be happy if they charge interest and penalties in addition to the CGT.Perhaps she thinks the way to pay this voluntary tax is to just … Continue Reading

Property flipping and knee jerk reactions

I must admit that the publicity about some Members of Parliament with two or more residences changing their designated main residence to one they are about to sell has me a little concerned because of all the publicity around it, and because of the public’s ire. The principal residence capital gains exemption is there for good reason, and whilst as with any rule it might be possible to exploit it to one’s advantage, the main purpose of electing as to which is the main residence is actually to prevent hardship or difficulty. Often people acquire a second property through the … Continue Reading